Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Exotic fauna.

You may be wondering how my garden is growing.

My neighborhood in Louisville has a monthly magazine, and the cover story features my little squash seedlings.
http://www.thehighlanderonline.com/current-issue/features/160-common-ground.html

Since the article was published, however, my garden has grown and blossomed. I've got dozens of volunteer squash and tomato plants, which makes me wonder why I bothered with seedlings. I've also got volunteeer dill galore and min, of course, and several other herbs dotting my front-yard.

All these things grow in Kentucky, but I've got a little fetish for exotic plants. Every time I go to Texas, I bring back a little cactus. My agave is tiny because it has to stay inside all the time. This year, I brought back a strange little curly-cue of a succulent, similar to a Christmas cactus, but but with longer segments. I want to be able to plant them in the ground directly, but it has rained here for a month. And despite the fact that I shelter the mystery-succulent from the rain, it's developing root rot.

I am not deterred. I've always wanted a palm tree in my yard. Specifically, I'd like a date palm because I adore dates. (If anyone is vacationing to Florida, would you please buy one of those palm trees they sell in the airport, and bring one to me?) But just a few days ago, a friend delievered a baby fig tree. Figs! I'm on a mission to winterize it and have it produce lovely delicious figs next summer.

If there are any other blog readers who like to deliver exotic fauna, I'd also like a pecan tree and a kalamata olive tree.

Maybe I should just move to USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 8.

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